Most Successful You School of Psychology & Neuroscience
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The History of Antisemitism and the Holocaust

Learn about the History of the Holocaust in this free online course created and developed by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Why should I take this course?

This course will provide you with accurate historical insight to the key driving factors that led to the Holocaust in Nazi Germany and Europe.
If you are a student/school pupil studying Psychology or History at GCSE level upwards, you will find this course a valuable addition to your knowledge and learning.
The course is equally valuable to those studying Psychology, particularly Social Psychology and Social Influence at any academic level.   
One of the factors leading to the Holocaust was a long history of antisemitism in Germany, Europe, and the world.
The Nazi-led government built on existing beliefs and prejudices in creating a racial ideology that resulted in the persecution and murder of Jews in Europe.
Antisemitism alone did not lead to the Holocaust, but it was a necessary precursor, contributing to an environment where prejudice, hate speech, and violence could occur.
This course is created by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and is offered as free access to all through the Most Successful You School of Psychology and Neuroscience.  

Course Content

What you will learn:

Module 1 Historical overview of antisemitism:
Lesson 1: The difference between belief, opinion, and fact.
Lesson 2: The definition of antisemitism
Lesson 3: The origins and history of antisemitism
Lesson 4: Ways that antisemitism has changed over time 

Module 2 Antisemitism and the Holocaust
Lesson 1: How racial antisemitism in Nazi Germany was different from the religious antisemitism of the past
Lesson 2: How antisemitism permeated German society legally and socially, and its impact on the Jewish community
Lesson 3: The dangers of prejudice and hate speech

Module 3 Antisemitism today
Lesson 1: How to recognize and think critically about antisemitism in society today
Lesson 2: Responses to antisemitism

Assessment activity

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